Polina Godz
Portfolio

The House of Bernarda Alba Posters

The poster was designed as a part of a larger art direction for the show
The House of Bernarda Alba at Brown University, directed by Sam Keamy-Minor. While designed in a poster design studio, the final design evolved in tandem with prop-making, documentation and program design in close collaboration with set designers, costume designers and a photographer. The poster was selected for multiple exhibitions, including Unlimited Edition, Spring Senior Invitational and the Poster Design show.

Spring 2015

A larger full-color poster and a smaller two-color poster for the distribution on campus

Facebook banner and the program materials

The Times of the Times

“The Times of the Times” is an 8-page newspaper that in a lighthearted way questions repetition and reiteration of time in the global printed media. It plays off of the ambiguity of the use of the word “time” in describing both repetition and duration. Starting as a singular poster responding to the mapping prompt in a studio called “Making Meaning” it quickly evolved into newspaper multiples. Selected for the Graphic Design senior show Unlimited Edition, and the 6th Annual Dual-Degree show.

Fall 2014

Central spread, the cover, the back and a stack of printed newspapers

Few additional spreads of the newspaper

Vasil Yermilov in the History of Cyrillic Type

“Vasil Yermilov in the History of Cyrillic Type Design” is a research into the legacy of Ukrainian painter and designer Vasil Yermilov that took form of a large-format accordion book, a series of posters, and a display font based on Yermilov’s sketches. The book is organized chrolonologically and spans over the life of Vasil Yermilov, interspersed with relevant facts about cyrillic literacy, lettering and type design, as well as major developments in the type design history. Because so much of the findings of the research project came from Yermilov’s sketches and notes, the book and posters are printed on quadrille that Yermilov used in his type drawings and lecture notes.

Fall 2015

Opening section of the book introducing the organization of the book

Middle section of the book drawing parallels between Yermilov’s work and Bauhaus type and education principles

Vasil Revival and Poster Series

“Vasil” is a revival display typeface that started with a historic investigation into Vasil Yermilov’s lettering and legacy as a graphic designer and a type designer in Kharkiv in the middle of the XXth century. While working on contextualizing Yermilov’s design legacy in the larger history of graphic design as a part of an independent study with Doug Scott, archival research resulted in discovering original hand-drawn type specimens and sketches for Yermilov’s display fonts and lettering. Using the sketches for cyrillic characters as a reference, an all-caps display font was developed with both cyrillic and latin glyphs.

Winter/Spring 2016

Vasil Yermilov’s original sketches for lettering and the proofs for the revival typeface

A series of posters presenting some of the findings of the archival research on Yermilov’s lettering

In Formation

“When Life Gives You Forms — OKAY” is a publication developed in response to an archive of visual and contextual references collected and presented on a weekly basis in a studio elective “Newly Formed”. It opens with an essay that articulates some thoughts on the hostory and modern-day implications of information spanning from the communication theory in the Postwar cybernetics to the way networked information plays into the politics of embodied art and activism today. The publication plays formally with the concepts of reference, archive and index, borrowing some typographic and layout cues from the above, while also engaging with freeform compositions that distill the archive into new forms.

Spring 2016

Select spreads, as well as the cover of the final publication

Some references collected weekly over the course of semester that guided the design of the publication

Newly Formed, Reformed

Newly Formed, Reformed is a collaborative “pocket” book (4.25" x 6.785") designed by the students in the “Newly Formed” elective. Each student was assigned 30 spreads to fill with the projects and sketches developed throughout the semester. While some of the spreads were designated to house the thumbnails of finished projects, majority were filled with freeform compositions repurposing the elements and formal leftover from previous projects. The chapter “Reformat” introduces a simple narrative by breaking the prompts into simple actions that allow one to repurpose forms in a visually arresting and innovative ways. The verbs were paired with compositions and layouts that showcase each action. The book can be purchased here

Spring 2016

Final 600+ collaborative pocket book

Few spreads from the chapter “Reformat” of the book

Portrait Posters

A diptych of posters developed under the art direction of Christopher Sleboda that uses elements and forms developed throughout the course “Newly Formed”. The posters feature original photography, as well as alphabets comprised of captcha glyphs and letters composed exclusively from accent symbols. The posters explore visual hierarchy as well as layering as their guiding principle.

Spring 2016

Final 24" x 36" posters presented as a diptych

Process materials and components for the final poster design

Object / System / Other

For this project students were challenged to come up with three different alphabets through three distinct approaches: using found shapes (object), devising a system of elements (system), and using a mix of those or an alternative method (other). While three alphabets that have been designed for this project have a very different feel, they were all a product of meticulous search for harmony between the letters. Following the principle that a typeface is not a collection of good letterforms, but rather a good collection of letterforms, each letter was picked out of numerous options. The system alphabet was further developed into a display font with approximately 100 glyphs, including multiple alternates.

Spring 2016

Final layouts for the three alphabets

Iterations of diiferent letters and process materials

Miscellaneous Newly Formed Projects

Throughout the course of a studio called “Newly Formed” students were encouraged to explore form-making and each week they would be assigned a loose prompt that they would respond to with printed matter. Later some of the formal explorations would be refined and reorganized resulting in books, posters, collaborative newspapers, and a week-long exhibition in the GD Commons.

Spring 2016

Series of large-format posters responding to various prompts

Process materials and components for the final poster design

Old and New Year

“Old New Year” is a series of medium format photographs that through the art direction and the formal qualities of film explore the feelings of nostalgia and liminality evoked by the end of winter holiday cycle. The name comes from an odd and largely marginal holiday — Old New Year that is celebrated in the former Soviet block two weeks after January 1st as a result of a switch from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar in 1918. Combining secular traditions with some of the oldest Christian and even pagan rituals this holiday is most cherished for the nostalgic sentiment it invokes. When at the end of January abandonned Christmas trees start appearing on the streets of New England it evoked similar feelings.

Winter 2015

Final selection of prints shot on HasselBlad medium format camera on b&w and color 120mm film.

The photos were processed at the printlab in Pawtucket, RI and digitally edited before being printed.

The College Hill Independent

The College Hill Independent is a weekly publication designed and edited by Brown University and RISD students. Even though it is published at the University, it is targetted at a broader Providence commuity and has a strong focus on arts and culture and is distributed around the larger Providence community.

Winter 2014 — Spring 2016

Cover redesigns for the College Hill Independent

Some covers and back pages from The College Hill Independent

March

“March” is a font developed over the course of one semester in the Type Design elective with Richard Lipton. It started with hand-drawn sketches and went over more than twenty iterations resulting in better understanding of the structure and mechanics of a typeface, as well as a rather traditional serif. March was originally inspired by Boris Vian’s novel Foam of the Daze that was complete in March 1946, but experienced popularity after its author’s death during the student protests of the sixties. The work on the typeface began in March, but it continues up until this day with a set of cyrillic glyphs as well as a bold and italic styles to follow.

Spring 2016

Final specimen pages for a collaborative specimen book

Sketches, marked proofs and various iterations of the font

Weekend Studio Identity

Weekend Studio identity is a custom font and a logo that uses type in tandem with some simple geometric forms that mimic the edges and slants of the letterforms. This identity started as a series of experiments on type-as-branding when the studio was more of an idea than a business. Now a vibrant production company it is using the custom font and the logo in pitching to clients, social media presence and business cards. The custom Weekend font is display serif based on traditional workhorse typefaces, such as Times, but features increased contrast and simplified terminals. The font inspired a series of shapes that compliment it to make up the simple, but versatile identity.

Spring/Summer 2016

Weekend font and a few variations on the Weekend Studio logo

Business cards designed using the Weekend font and the logotype

Letter and Neon

Completed as a part of the degree requirement at the Rhode Island School of Design, Letter and Neon is a curation of objects and documents that explore the themes and mechanics of Boris Vian’s novel Foam of the Daze . Material explorations as well as conceptual experiments culminate in a loosely bound collection of signatures that elaborate on the tools devised through such experiments as well as their relationship to the original text. Through the framework of Umberto Eco’s concept of transmutation the project becomes a prototype for an imaginary book that is referenced in the original text where a tome of Sartre’s seminal L’Etre et Le Néant becomes a lighthearted La Lettre et le Neon by Jean-Sol Partre.

Spring 2016

Documentation of a final presentation of a project during degree project reviews

Stills from a video introduction of the project that can
be found here

Command+U

“Command+U” is an interactive box and a book documenting experiments around the topic of saturation adjustment. Starting with a series of formal explorations of the tool in Photoshop, the book expands into the history and breadth of applications of the intenisty of color. The research touches on color spaces, color keying and new media interface theory and culminates in a short essay. The book sits on top of the box that in a playful analog way mimics the saturation adjustment and presents both a loose assortment of desaturated materials and a series of prints developed using collage, digital alteration and saturation adjustment, resulting in formally engaging artefacts and unusual effects.

Fall 2013

An interactive box with a book sitting on top of it

Some spreads from the book and digital composition prints

Blue Book Paradox

“Blue Book Paradox” is an intervention project in which an auditorium of graphic design students and professors were given folded blue books and told that they will be asked to take a surprise quiz sometime between the first and the last presentations of the day, but they will not know when, thus simulating the unexpected hanging paradox. Later the students and professors were asked to unfold the books revealing a poster explaining the premise and the history of the mathematical paradox. The book, poster and experience were designed as a part of a weekend workshop with Mathew Monk and conceived in collaboration with fellow students. It was selected for RISD GD Triennial and Unlimited Edition exhibitions.

Fall 2014

Printed blue books folded and unfolded to reveal an explanatory poster

A digaram explaining the unfolding of the book designed for a presentation of the project

October

“October” is a short film produced by overimposing the audio from a recent news broadcast describing the toppling of the largest Lenin statue in Kharkiv, Ukraine and the video excerpts from Sergei Eisenstein’s 1927 film October. It is complimented by a printed zine featuring some of the most striking juxtapositions between the image and the subtitled text, captured in a series of stills. The zine exists somewhere between a flipbook and a photobook, expanding the number of ways in which you can interact with the archival media.

Fall 2014

Stills from a short film “October” found here

Printed zine with stills from the film

Contact

Polina Godz
Portfolio

The House of Bernarda Alba Posters

The poster was designed as a part of a larger art direction for the show The House of Bernarda Alba at Brown University, directed by Sam Keamy-Minor . While designed in a poster design studio, the final design evolved in tandem with prop-making, documentation and program design in close collaboration with set designers, costume designers and a photographer. The poster was selected for multiple exhibitions, including Unlimited Edition, Spring Senior Invitational and the Poster Design show.

The Times of the Times

“The Times of the Times” is an 8-page newspaper that in a lighthearted way questions repetition and reiteration of time in the global printed media. It plays off of the ambiguity of the use of the word “time” in describing both repetition and duration. Starting as a singular poster responding to the mapping prompt in a studio called “Making Meaning” it quickly evolved into newspaper multiples. Selected for the Graphic Design senior show Unlimited Edition, and the 6th Annual Dual-Degree show.

Vasil Yermilov in the History of Cyrillic Type

“Vasil Yermilov in the History of Cyrillic Type Design” is a research into the legacy of Ukrainian painter and designer Vasil Yermilov that took form of a large-format accordion book, a series of posters, and a display font based on Yermilov’s sketches. The book is organized chrolonologically and spans over the life of Vasil Yermilov, interspersed with relevant facts about cyrillic literacy, lettering and type design, as well as major developments in the type design history. Because so much of the findings of the research project came from Yermilov’s sketches and notes, the book and posters are printed on quadrille that Yermilov used in his type drawings and lecture notes.

Vasil Revival and Poster Series

“Vasil” is a revival display typeface that started with a historic investigation into Vasil Yermilov’s lettering and legacy as a graphic designer and a type designer in Kharkiv in the middle of the XXth century. While working on contextualizing Yermilov’s design legacy in the larger history of graphic design as a part of an independent study with Doug Scott, archival research resulted in discovering original hand-drawn type specimens and sketches for Yermilov’s display fonts and lettering. Using the sketches for cyrillic characters as a reference, an all-caps display font was developed with both cyrillic and latin glyphs. The font can be downloaded here .

In Formation

“When Life Gives You Forms — OKAY” is a publication developed in response to an archive of visual and contextual references collected and presented on a weekly basis in a studio elective “Newly Formed”. It opens with an essay that articulates some thoughts on the hostory and modern-day implications of information spanning from the communication theory in the Postwar cybernetics to the way networked information plays into the politics of embodied art and activism today. The publication plays formally with the concepts of reference, archive and index, borrowing some typographic and layout cues from the above, while also engaging with freeform compositions that distill the archive into new forms.

Newly Formed, Reformed

Newly Formed, Reformed is a collaborative “pocket” book (4.25" x 6.785") designed by the students in the “Newly Formed” elective. Each student was assigned 30 spreads to fill with the projects and sketches developed throughout the semester. While some of the spreads were designated to house the thumbnails of finished projects, majority were filled with freeform compositions repurposing the elements and formal leftover from previous projects. The chapter “Reformat” introduces a simple narrative by breaking the prompts into simple actions that allow one to repurpose forms in a visually arresting and innovative ways. The verbs were paired with compositions and layouts that showcase each action. The book can be purchased here

Portrait Posters

A diptych of posters developed under the art direction of Christopher Sleboda that uses elements and forms developed throughout the course “Newly Formed”. The posters feature original photography, as well as alphabets comprised of captcha glyphs and letters composed exclusively from accent symbols. The posters explore visual hierarchy as well as layering as their guiding principle.

Object / System / Other

For this project students were challenged to come up with three different alphabets through three distinct approaches: using found shapes (object), devising a system of elements (system), and using a mix of those or an alternative method (other). While three alphabets that have been designed for this project have a very different feel, they were all a product of meticulous search for harmony between the letters. Following the principle that a typeface is not a collection of good letterforms, but rather a good collection of letterforms, each letter was picked out of numerous options. The system alphabet was further developed into a display font with approximately 100 glyphs, including multiple alternates.

Miscellaneous Newly Formed Projects

Throughout the course of a studio called “Newly Formed” students were encouraged to explore form-making and each week they would be assigned a loose prompt that they would respond to with printed matter. Later some of the formal explorations would be refined and reorganized resulting in books, posters, collaborative newspapers, and a week-long exhibition in the GD Commons.

Old and New Year

“Old New Year” is a series of medium format photographs that through the art direction and the formal qualities of film explore the feelings of nostalgia and liminality evoked by the end of winter holiday cycle. The name comes from an odd and largely marginal holiday — Old New Year that is celebrated in the former Soviet block two weeks after January 1st as a result of a switch from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar in 1918. Combining secular traditions with some of the oldest Christian and even pagan rituals this holiday is most cherished for the nostalgic sentiment it invokes. When at the end of January abandonned Christmas trees start appearing on the streets of New England it evoked similar feelings.

The College Hill Independent

The College Hill Independent is a weekly publication designed and edited by Brown University and RISD students. Even though it is published at the University, it is targetted at a broader Providence commuity and has a strong focus on arts and culture and is distributed around the larger Providence community.

March

“March” is a font developed over the course of one semester in the Type Design elective with Richard Lipton. It started with hand-drawn sketches and went over more than twenty iterations resulting in better understanding of the structure and mechanics of a typeface, as well as a rather traditional serif. March was originally inspired by Boris Vian’s novel Foam of the Daze that was complete in March 1946, but experienced popularity after its author’s death during the student protests of the sixties. The work on the typeface began in March, but it continues up until this day with a set of cyrillic glyphs as well as a bold and italic styles to follow.

Letter and Neon

Completed as a part of the degree requirement at the Rhode Island School of Design, Letter and Neon is a curation of objects and documents that explore the themes and mechanics of Boris Vian’s novel Foam of the Daze . Material explorations as well as conceptual experiments culminate in a loosely bound collection of signatures that elaborate on the tools devised through such experiments as well as their relationship to the original text. Through the framework of Umberto Eco’s concept of transmutation the project becomes a prototype for an imaginary book that is referenced in the original text where a tome of Sartre’s seminal L’Etre et Le Néant becomes a lighthearted La Lettre et le Neon by Jean-Sol Partre.

Command+U

“Command+U” is an interactive box and a book documenting experiments around the topic of saturation adjustment. Starting with a series of formal explorations of the tool in Photoshop, the book expands into the history and breadth of applications of the intenisty of color. The research touches on color spaces, color keying and new media interface theory and culminates in a short essay. The book sits on top of the box that in a playful analog way mimics the saturation adjustment and presents both a loose assortment of desaturated materials and a series of prints developed using collage, digital alteration and saturation adjustment, resulting in formally engaging artefacts and unusual effects.

Blue Book Paradox

“Blue Book Paradox” is an intervention project in which an auditorium of graphic design students and professors were given folded blue books and told that they will be asked to take a surprise quiz sometime between the first and the last presentations of the day, but they will not know when, thus simulating the unexpected hanging paradox. Later the students and professors were asked to unfold the books revealing a poster explaining the premise and the history of the mathematical paradox. The book, poster and experience were designed as a part of a weekend workshop with Mathew Monk and conceived in collaboration with fellow students. It was selected for RISD GD Triennial and Unlimited Edition exhibitions.

October

“October” is a short film produced by overimposing the audio from a recent news broadcast describing the toppling of the largest Lenin statue in Kharkiv, Ukraine and the video excerpts from Sergei Eisenstein’s 1927 film October. It is complimented by a printed zine featuring some of the most striking juxtapositions between the image and the subtitled text, captured in a series of stills. The zine exists somewhere between a flipbook and a photobook, expanding the number of ways in which you can interact with the archival media.



Contact:
polina_godz@alumni.brown.edu
pgodz@alumni.risd.edu